A Genealogical and Heraldic History of The Commoners of Great Britain And Ireland Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank: But Uninvested With Heritable Honours. History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. Dymoke, of Scrivelsby. Líneage. Robert de Marmyon , Lord of Fontney , in Normandy , having by grant of King William the castle of Tamworth , in the county of Warwick , with the adjacent lands, expelled the nuns from the abbey of Polesworth , to a place called Oldbury , about four miles distant. "After which." (writes Sir William Dugdale ,) "within the compass of a twelvemonth, as it is said, making a costly entertainment at Tamworth Castle , for some of his friends, amongst whom was Sir Walter de Somervile , Lord of Whichover , in the county of Stafford , his sworn brother, it happened, that as he lay in his bed, St. Edith appeared to him in the habit of a veiled nun, with a crosier in her hand, and advertised him, that if he did not restore the abbey of Polesworth , which lay within the territories belonging to his castle of Tamworth, unto her successors, he should have an evil death, and go to hell. And, that he might be the more sensible of this her admonition, she smote him on the side with the point of her crosier, and so vanished away. Moreover, that by this stroke being much wounded, he cryed out so loud, that his friends in the house arose; and, finding him extremely tormented with the pain of his wound, advised him to confess himself to a priest, and vow to restore the nuns to their former possessions. Furthermore, that having so done, his pain ceased; and that in accomplishment of his vow, accompanied by Sir Walter de Somervile , and the rest, he forthwith rode to Oldbury ; and, craving pardon of the nuns for the injury done, brought them back to Polesworth , desiring that himself and his friend Sir Walter de Somervile might be reputed their patrons, and have burial for themselves and their heirs in the abbey-the Marmions in the chapter house-the Somerviles in the cloyster. However some circumstances in this story (continued Dugdale ,) may seem fabulous, the substance of it is certainly true; for it expressly appeareth by the very words of his charter that he gave to Osanna the prioress, for the establishing of the religion of those nuns there the church of St. Edith, of Polesworth , with its appurtenances, so that the convent of Olabury should remain in that place; and likewise bestowed upon them the whole lordship of Polesworth : which grant King Stephen afterwards confirmed." The castle and mannor of Tamworth , in Warwickshire , and the manor of Scrivelsby , in the county of Lincoln , were granted by the Conqueror to this Robert de Marmion , to be held by grant Normandy , prior to the conquest of England ). Robert Marmion was succeeded at his decease by his son and heir, A Genealogical and Heraldic History of The Commoners of Great Britain And Ireland Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank: But Uninvested With Heritable Honours. History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. Dymoke, of Scrivelsby. Líneage. Robert de Marmion , Lord of Fontney , in Normandy , where he possessed a fortified castle, which was besieged by Geoffrey , of Anjou , in the 4th of King Stephen, and demolished. This Robert having a great enmity to the Earl of Chester , who had a noble seat at Coventry , entered the priory there in the 8th of Stephen, and, expelling the monks, turned it into a fortification, digging at the same time divers deep ditches in the adjacent fields, which he caused to be covered over with earth, in order to secure the approaches thereto; but the Earl of Chester's forces drawing near, as he rode out to reconnoitre, he fell into one of those very ditches, and broke his thigh, so that a common soldier, presently seizing him, cut off his head. He was s. by his son, A Genealogical and Heraldic History of The Commoners of Great Britain And Ireland Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank: But Uninvested With Heritable Honours. History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. Dymoke, of Scrivelsby. Líneage. Robert de Marmion , who, in the 31st Henry II., being constituted sheriff of Worcestershire , continued in that office until the end of the four-and-thirtieth year of the same reign. He was also justice itinerant in Warwickshire , and some other counties, and again sheriff of Worcestershire in the 1st of Richard I. In five years afterwards he attended that monarch into Normandy , and in the 15th of King John he was in the expedition, then made into Poictou . This feudal lord died about the year 1217 , leaving issue, by different mothers, A Genealogical and Heraldic History of The Commoners of Great Britain And Ireland Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank: But Uninvested With Heritable Honours. History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. Dymoke, of Scrivelsby. Líneage. Robert , his successor. A Genealogical and Heraldic History of The Commoners of Great Britain And Ireland Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank: But Uninvested With Heritable Honours. History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. Dymoke, of Scrivelsby. Líneage. Robert , jun., who had the estate of Witringham and Coninsby , in the county of Lincoln . A Genealogical and Heraldic History of The Commoners of Great Britain And Ireland Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank: But Uninvested With Heritable Honours. History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. Dymoke, of Scrivelsby. Líneage. William , of Torington . A Genealogical and Heraldic History of The Commoners of Great Britain And Ireland Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank: But Uninvested With Heritable Honours. History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. Dymoke, of Scrivelsby. Líneage. He was s. by his eldest son, A Genealogical and Heraldic History of The Commoners of Great Britain And Ireland Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank: But Uninvested With Heritable Honours. History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. Dymoke, of Scrivelsby. Líneage. Robert de Marmion , who appears to have sided with the French, when they seized upon Normandy in the beginning of King John 's reign, for the murder of Arthur , Duke of Brittany ; but afterwards to have made his peace, for in the 5th of Henry III. he had livery of Tamworth Castle and his father's other lands. He is supposed to have returned to Normandy in twelve years afterwards, and to have died there in 1241 , when he was s. by his son, A Genealogical and Heraldic History of The Commoners of Great Britain And Ireland Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank: But Uninvested With Heritable Honours. History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. Dymoke, of Scrivelsby. Líneage. Philip de Marmion , who was sheriff for the counties of Warwick and Leicester , from the 33rd to the 36th of Henry III.-in the latter of which years he was questioned for sitting with Richard de Mundevill , and the rest of the justices, for gaol delivery at Warwick , having no commission so to do. The next year he attended the king into Gascony ; upon his return whence he was taken prisoner by the French at Pontes , in Poictou , with John de Plessets , then Earl of Warwick , notwithstanding they had letters of safe conduct from the king of France . In the 45th of the same reign this feudal lord had summons to be at London with divers of the nobility, upon the morrow after Simon and Jude 's day; in which year the defection of many of the barons began further to manifest itself, by their assuming the royal prerogative, in placing sheriffs throughout different shires. In this period of difficulty Philip de Marmion , being of unimpeachable loyalty, had, by special patent from the king, the counties of Suffolk and Norfolk committed to his custody, with the castles of Norwich and Orford ; a well-judged confidence, for through all the subsequent fortunes of Henry III. he never once swerved from his allegiance. He was present at the battle of Lewes -and his fidelity was rewarded after the royal victory of Evesham , by some valuable grants for life, and the governorship of Kenilworth Castle . He m. Joane , youngest daughter, and eventually sole heiress of Hugh de Kilpec , of Kilpec Castle , in Herefordshire , by whom he had four daughters, his co-heirs, viz. A Genealogical and Heraldic History of The Commoners of Great Britain And Ireland Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank: But Uninvested With Heritable Honours. History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. Dymoke, of Scrivelsby. Líneage. Joane , m. to William Morteyn , and died s. p. in 1294 .
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